Human Resources Articles

July 1, 2016

Checking Motor Vehicle Records on District Drivers

Many HR departments run motor vehicle records (MVR) checks on new hires, or ask applicants to provide their current MVR. It is a good idea to do this when hiring drivers. A quick review of Colorado’s licensing laws could also prevent a future headaches because there are many lesser-known ways that drivers can lose their license.

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October 8, 2015

Courts Drop the Hammer on Employees Using Medical Marijuana

In a case with vast implications for employers in states that have legalized the medical and recreational use of marijuana, the Colorado Supreme Court recently ruled in favor of a business that fired an employee for failing a drug test. The company admits that Coats wasn’t high on the job but cited its zero-tolerance drug policy as the reason for the dismissal.

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October 7, 2015

When is a Volunteer an “Employee” for Purposes of Title VII?

Volunteering is an important activity for millions of Americans. Generally, volunteers are not protected “employees.” But what happens when an unpaid volunteer claims that he or she has been discriminated against in the course of his or her service? Courts have addressed this issue and provided clarity for volunteers and employers alike.

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October 7, 2015

Are You Putting Your Employees in the Right Box?

While it may seem like classifying employees as contractors could potentially save your district money, doing so may violate the DOL’s Fair Labor Standards Act. Applying the factors laid out in this article can help assure that your district stays in compliance with federal law.

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July 14, 2015

Employee Use of District Equipment a Risky Proposition

Every district uses equipment which employees need to do their job, and this equipment is generally provided by the district. While a reasonable amount of personal use of district-owned equipment like computers or photocopiers is realistic, there are many types of equipment that pose serious problems if used outside the scope of an employee’s job responsibilities because they significantly increase the likelihood of a loss.

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July 13, 2015

Making Your Jobsite Safer for Visitors

During a normal construction or renovation project, there may be any number of tradespeople on the jobsite on any particular day. Those workers have received the safety training the owner expects, and it’s reasonable to assume that they’ll adhere to the rules and standards that have been established. But what about the other people who may have a reason to be on the site?

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April 13, 2015

Workers’ Compensation Being Stretched Thin by Obesity Epidemic

Over the past 20 years, there has been a dramatic increase in obesity in the United States. The economic consequences are severe. The estimated annual medical cost of obesity in the U.S. was $147 billion in 2008 (the most recent year that data is available from the CDC). On an individual level, medical costs for obese people were $1,429 higher on average than those of normal weight.

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April 13, 2015

Making Onsite Training More Effective

contributed by Safety Management Group For most of today’s workplaces, training is an ongoing activity that is increasingly important. Whether training focuses on sharing safe work practices, learning about new processes, or simply getting a refresher for familiar skills or tasks, employers place a high value on these activities.

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January 1, 2015

Covering Your Next Generation: Unpaid Interns and Workers’ Compensation

Providing internship opportunities is a great way to find capable and skilled young workers who can add value to your organization. It is also an opportunity for you to help tomorrow’s industry professionals gain experience, develop skills, forge connections, strengthen their resumes, and assess their interests and professional abilities.

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October 1, 2013

Federal Restrictions on Random Testing

The Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 requires some federal contractors and all federal grantees to provide drug-free workplaces as a condition of getting grants or contracts from a federal agency. Most states also require this as a condition of receiving state grants or contracts, which are often fully or partially funded with federal funds. This act doesn’t apply to any local government which does not intend to apply or already have federal funds.

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